Toolkit References

  1. Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada. A near miss involving cyclophosphamide. ISMP Canada Safety Bulletin [Internet] 2008 [cited 2015 Oct 7]; 8(7):1-2. Available from: http://ismp-canada.org/download/safetyBulletins/ISMPCSB2008-07CylophosphamideNearMiss.pdf
  2. Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada. Insulin errors. ISMP Canada Safety Bulletin [Internet] 2003 [cited 2015 Oct 7]; 3(4):1-2. Available from: http://www.ismp-canada.org/download/safetyBulletins/ISMPCSB2003-04Insulin.pdf
  3. Langley GL, Nolan KM, Nolan TW, Norman CL, Provost LP. The improvement guide: a practical approach to enhancing organizational performance. 2nd ed. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers; 2009. Website: Associates in Process Improvement, www.apiweb.org
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  9. United Kingdom Department of Health. Essence of care 2010. Norwich: The Stationery Office; 2010 [cited 2015 Oct 7]. Available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/essence-of-care-2010
  10. Isaac J. Good Samaritan Society Health Records Manager. Personal communication (phone). March 2014.
  11. Traynor K. Enforcement outdoes education at eliminating unsafe abbreviations. American Journal of Health-Systems Pharmacy. 2004; 61:1314, 1317, 1322.
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  16. Institute for Safe Medication Practices. ISMP’s list of error-prone abbreviations, symbols, and dose designations [Internet]. 2004 [cited 2015 Oct 7]. Available from: https://www.ismp.org/tools/errorproneabbreviations.pdf
  17. The Joint Commission. Facts about the official “do not use” list [Internet]. 2013 [cited 2015 Oct 7]. Available from: http://www.jointcommission.org/facts_about_do_not_use_list
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  21. Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Science of improvement: Forming the team [Internet]. No date [cited 2015 Oct 7]. Available from: http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/HowtoImprove/ScienceofImprovementFormingtheTeam.aspx
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  25. Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Science of improvement: Establishing measures [Internet]. No date [cited 2015 Oct 7]. Available from: http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/HowtoImprove/ScienceofImprovementEstablishingMeasures.aspx
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  31. Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada. Ontario critical incident learning: Designing effective recommendations [Internet]. 2013 [cited 2015 Oct 7]; (4). Available from: http://www.ismp-canada.org/download/ocil/ISMPCONCIL2013-4_EffectiveRecommendations.pdf
  32. Institute for Safe Medication Practices. Medication error prevention ‘toolbox’. Acute Care ISMP Medication Safety Alert [Internet]. 1999 [cited 2015 Oct 7]; June 2. Available from: https://www.ismp.org/newsletters/acutecare/articles/19990602.asp
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  47. Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada. Labelling and packaging: An aggregate analysis of medication incident reports [Internet]. 2013 [cited 2015 Oct 7]. Available from: http://www.ismp-canada.org/download/LabellingPackaging/ISMPC2013_LabellingPackaging_FullReport.pdf
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  58. Institute of Safe Medication Practices Canada. Knowledge translation of insulin use interventions/safeguards. Report to Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care [Internet]. 2012 [cited 2015 Oct 7]. Available from: http://www.ismp-canada.org/download/insulin/KnowledgeTranslationInsulinInterventions.pdf
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